Recent News & Updates

Recent News

Belmont CDC Hosts Toy Drive

A letter from the Belmont CDC:

Belmont Community Development Corporation

700 Parkwood Ave, Suite 204

Charlotte, NC 28205

 

November 21, 2017

Dear Friends:

I am writing to ask for your support as a sponsor for the Belmont Community Development Corporation Christmas Program 2017. The Belmont Community Development Corporation (CDC) is a 501© (3) non-profit organization that provides assistance to families in the Belmont and surrounding communities.

Now more than ever, these families need your help!

The Belmont CDC Family Christmas Program provides various assistance to families who have children ages 2-12 years.  We all know how important the holidays are to children and we understand that it is often a challenge for the families we serve to find the extra funds in their budget for the holiday season. Therefore, we are asking for your support in collecting unwrapped toys for boys and girls who are 2-12 years old, or a monetary donation that can be used to purchase items for our Toy Drive. Because of kind and generous sponsors like you, we are able to help minimize some of the financial stress these families experience during the holiday season and bring joy, peace and happiness to little ones.

If you are able to support our Toy Drive, please deliver your items to Belmont CDC, 700 Parkwood Ave, Suite 204, Charlotte, NC 28205, no later than December 18, 2017, 9:00am – 5:00pm.

Please feel free to contact me at (704) 379-7471 from 9:30 am – 5:00 pm Monday through Friday, or via email at carlenegreene@bellsouth.net.

Thank you for considering this request.

Carlene Switzer-Greene

Program Manager

Belmont CDC

700 Parkwood Ave, Suite 204

Charlotte, NC 28205

Direct#: 704.379.7471

Fax#: 704.332.6929

carlenegreene@bellsouth.net

 

Your donation is Tax deductible to the full extent of the law.

 

Is A New Puppy or Kitten on Your List to Santa?

Rabies shots are free to all Mecklenburg County residents who have dogs, cats and/or ferrets over the age of 4 months.

Visit the Rabies Clinic page to make sure that you have everything you need the day of the clinic which will help lower your wait time.

Char-Meck Pet licensing can be purchased the same day. Visit the Licensing page for the fees.

Micro​chips are $10 per pet. This fee includes the cost of the chip itself, registration in the Char-Meck database, AND the registration to the national database through Pet Link. Owners who would like to purchase a microchip are NOT limited toMecklenburg County. Pets should be at least 8 weeks old when receiving a microchip. Visit the Microchip page​ for complete details.

Event Details

Start Date: 12/9/2017

Start Time: 8:00 AM

End Date: 12/9/2017

End Time: 11:00 AM

Location: Animal Care & Control

Address: 8315 Byrum Dr Charlotte NC 28217 Get map

2017 Audit Report

Members of the community, Jonathan Kearney and Arthur McGruder, were asked to complete an audit of the Belmont Community Association (“the Association”), its financial activities, expenditures, and compliance with applicable rules and regulations for year ended December 31, 2017. The audit team’s findings are outlined in the PDF below along with scope limitations and suggestions.

 

Audit-Report-2017

 

View or Print the Audit here.

 

 

Nominations Slate for 2018 Board of Directors

The Nominations Committee is tasked with preparing a slate of officers to be voted upon at the Annual Meeting (December 5, 2017). The committee should be chaired by the immediate past president and include 2 additional members at large. Since there is no immediate past president, Vicki Jones, the current president, convened committee members that were voted on by the members at the October community meeting. Committee members are Minister Anderson, Amber Gregory, and Carol Ward.

The bylaws state that the Belmont Community Association (BCA) shall be governed by a board of directors consisting of no less than three (3) members. Board members must be members in good standing prior to and during the service term(s). The makeup of the board should strive to be a majority of residents with representation from the other membership types – non-resident property owners, organizations, and businesses. The term for all offices is one year, starting in January, or until their successors are elected and qualified. Officers can be elected for 3 consecutive terms. After that, they must sit out for 1 term before running for the same office again. Upon exception, term limits can be extended if vetted and recommended by the nominations committee.

The committee presents the following slate of officers; however, nominations will be accepted from the floor at the Annual Meeting. The committee will continue to work to fill the open positions (Treasurer, Quality of Life, and Social) and bring a slate to vote in January 2018. The number of years noted below are the number of years the individual has served on the board.

  • Executive Committee
    • President – Vicki Jones (7 years)
    • Vice President – Curtis Bridges (1 year)
    • Secretary – Lindsay Olson (filled vacated position in 2017)
    • Treasurer – OPEN
  • At-large Directors
    • Advisory Board Liaison – Minister Anderson (new position)
    • Business Liaison – Kevin Giriunas (1 year)
    • Communications – Kristen Paulet (1 year)
    • Community Engagement – Lauren Nguyen (filled vacated position in 2017)
    • Fundraising / Grants – Diane Adams (7 years in various roles)
    • Land Use – Lorna Allen (2 years)
    • Quality of Life – OPEN
    • Social – OPEN (new position)

2018 Candidates

These candidates were asked to complete a series of questions so you could learn more about their interest in Belmont and serving on the board. Their responses are on the following pages.

President – Vicki Jones (7 years)

  1. How long have you lived in Belmont? 10 years
  2. What is your favorite aspect of Belmont? While the location and skyline views brought me to Belmont, the neighbors are what keep me here and passionate about the work of the Belmont Community Association.
  3. What changes would you like to see happen in Belmont? How could you be helpful with those changes? I want to serve all our residents and work to blend the needs of both long-term and new residents. I recognize the general changes and development challenges Belmont is facing so I strive to have the best and most knowledgeable people involved to serve the best interest of our community.
  4. Tell us about your skills, ie. writing, event planning, finance, relationship building, etc. I am a planner/organizer at heart, as well as a life-long learner. I seek opportunities to learn how to better serve Belmont.
  5. Are you able to commit to monthly board meetings, neighborhood meetings, and volunteering at BCA events? Yes

 

Vice President – Curtis Bridges (1 year)

  1. How long have you lived in Belmont?  I’ve lived in Belmont for 4 years, as of this December!
  2. What is your favorite aspect of Belmont?  I love that Belmont is a true urban neighborhood, with neighbors who walk around and know/talk to each other, and buildings which have history and character
  3. What changes would you like to see happen in Belmont? How could you be helpful with those changes? I would like to see old and new residents of Belmont continue to become comfortable with determining how Belmont grows while remaining “home” for all of us.
  4. Tell us about your skills, ie. writing, event planning, finance, relationship building, etc. My professional life involves quite a bit of leading/facilitating group efforts, planning, writing, budgeting, and communicating.
  5. Are you able to commit to monthly board meetings, neighborhood meetings, and volunteering at BCA events? Yes, I currently participate in monthly board and neighborhood meetings and volunteer or attend most BCA events.

 

Secretary – Lindsay Olson (filled vacated position in 2017)

  1. How long have you lived in Belmont? Just over four years. I moved in October 2013.
  2. What is your favorite aspect of Belmont? There is so much! I love my neighbors, the location, walkability, and the architecture. 
  3. What changes would you like to see happen in Belmont? How could you be helpful with those changes? Seeing our community work together towards common goals to promote inclusiveness, a safe and welcoming neighborhood and to make sure everyone has a voice. A neighborhood in which we support and care for one another. I already see this happening and it is amazing to watch and be a part of!! I am very proud to call Belmont home!!
  4. Tell us about your skills, ie. writing, event planning, finance, relationship building, etc.
  5. Are you able to commit to monthly board meetings, neighborhood meetings, and volunteering at BCA events? Yes

 

Advisory Board Liaison – Minister Anderson (new position)

  1. How long have you lived in Belmont? I have lived in the Belmont neighborhood for approximately twenty years
  2. What is your favorite aspect of Belmont? My favorite aspect of Belmont is the older houses and memories. 
  3. What changes would you like to see happen in Belmont? How could you be helpful with those changes? I would like to see more community events with the involvement of neighbors. I could be helpful with those changes by reaching out to new and old neighbors as often as possible.
  4. Tell us about your skills, ie. writing, event planning, finance, relationship building, etc. I worked as the supervisor of Seventh Street Detox Center for approximately ten years. In 1986 our family organized Generations of Change Ministry of which I was the president. I facilitated big events in the Belmont neighborhood at Cordelia Park, Hawthorne School, and the Belmont Center. These events were done under Generations of Change Ministry.
  5. Are you able to commit to monthly board meetings, neighborhood meetings, and volunteering at BCA events? I am now retired and available to attend monthly board meetings, neighborhood meetings, and to volunteer at BCA events when needed.

 

Business Liaison – Kevin Giriunas (1 year)

  1. How long have you lived in Belmont?  I have owned Advent Coworking in Belmont for 2 years.
  2. What is your favorite aspect of Belmont? The intention of keeping it special.
  3. What changes would you like to see happen in Belmont? How could you be helpful with those changes? Businesses mixed into the neighborhood (Belmont Ave. specifically). Help support the businesses with marketing and unify all the business owners in Belmont.
  4. Tell us about your skills, ie. writing, event planning, finance, relationship building, etc.  We plan events almost every week, I run my own business which forces me to do finance, facility management, and lots of writing. I own and run a coworking space which is focused on building community, so we are always connecting people.
  5. Are you able to commit to monthly board meetings, neighborhood meetings, and volunteering at BCA events? Yes!

 

Communications – Kristen Paulet (1 year)

  1. How long have you lived in Belmont? 2 years this December!
  2. What is your favorite aspect of Belmont? The community and neighbors; the way people will come together to help a cause or fellow neighbor.
  3. What changes would you like to see happen in Belmont? How could you be helpful with those changes?      I would like to see longtime residents and senior neighbors have more access and awareness to resources and value. We have so many well connected and well-informed residents, and I can help leverage their knowledge and skills through communication channels (both in print and digitally).
  4. Tell us about your skills, ie. writing, event planning, finance, relationship building, etc. My career is sharing communication in all formats and connecting resources to those in need. I can bring new ideas while also creating communication formats that connect our “disconnected” residents.
  5. Are you able to commit to monthly board meetings, neighborhood meetings, and volunteering at BCA events? Yes.

 

Community Engagement – Lauren Nguyen (filled vacated position in 2017)

  1. How long have you lived in Belmont? 2 years 
  2. What is your favorite aspect of Belmont? The people and location
  3. What changes would you like to see happen in Belmont? How could you be helpful with those changes? More community events to get neighbors to interact with each other. Bridging gaps between old and new. Sharing ideas on what they want to see in the community, giving a voice for those that don’t get heard often
  4. Tell us about your skills, ie. writing, event planning, finance, relationship building, etc. I do a little event planning, I can be organized when focused (haha), relationship building, and a want to establish trust. 
  5. Are you able to commit to monthly board meetings, neighborhood meetings, and volunteering at BCA events? Yes 

 

Fundraising / Grants – Diane Adams (7 years in various roles)

  1. How long have you lived in Belmont?  9 years
  2. What is your favorite aspect of Belmont? Neighbors and walkability.
  3. What changes would you like to see happen in Belmont? How could you be helpful with those changes? Cleaner streets. I can help by participating in street cleanups.
  4. Tell us about your skills, ie. writing, event planning, finance, relationship building, etc. Grant writing, implementation, event planning and housing.
  5. Are you able to commit to monthly board meetings, neighborhood meetings, and volunteering at BCA events? Yes

 

Land Use – Lorna Allen (2 years)

  1. How long have you lived in Belmont? 3 years
  2. What is your favorite aspect of Belmont? I love how many people in the neighborhood care and want to work together to make this a wonderful place to live in Charlotte. From the neighbors who have lived in Belmont their entire lives to the neighbors who moved in just this year – our neighborhood has a strong sense of pride and is comprised of people who care about their neighbors. 
  3. What changes would you like to see happen in Belmont? How could you be helpful with those changes? My goal for Belmont is to encourage positive development and investment that is mindful of the history and integrity of the neighborhood. 
  4. Tell us about your skills, ie. writing, event planning, finance, relationship building, etc. With my background in planning and urban design, I volunteered to co-chair the land use committee to identify, research, and inform on land use issues that impact the Vision of the Belmont Community. 
  5. Are you able to commit to monthly board meetings, neighborhood meetings, and volunteering at BCA events?  Yes

 

Open Roles

Please consider serving Belmont in the following roles. Email belmontcharlotte@gmail.com if you are interested or want to learn more.

  • Treasurerapproximately 1-2 hrs / month
    • Manage the checking account: deposit money, write checks, monitor statements
    • Report to board and community of account status
    • Track membership, send notice when membership is expiring
    • Support audit committee needs
    • Submit annual tax returns and 501c3 reports
    • Monitor Gmail account
  • Quality of Lifeapproximately 2-3 hrs / month
    • Work with the neighborhood police officers, code enforcement, residents and stakeholders to promote a safe community
    • Act as a liaison with governmental bodies and other institutions / entities in and around the neighborhood
    • Promote neighborhood beautification projects (including quarterly clean up coordination).
    • Monitor Gmail account
  • Socialapproximately 1-2 hrs / month
    • Manage a committee to plan and execute social events throughout the year (including block party, meetups, National Night Out, etc.)
    • Recruit event committee and lead planner for each event. Role does not have to plan each event, but work and support the lead planner
    • Monitor Gmail account

Centra Square Update (11/14/17)

The Centra Square affordable and senior housing development is nearing completion.

Affordable units are anticipated to be available January/February 2018, while senior housing – Moss Place at Centra Square – is anticipated for March/April 2018.

Centra Square staff will begin accepting “Pre-Screening Applications” on Monday, November 20th at the temporary leasing office located at 1400 Allen Street. Signage will be located on Allen Street and 17th Street directing applicants to the temporary leasing office.

Below are important notes regarding the application process:

  • Download/print “Pre-Screening Applications” here or from the leasing office
  • Centra Square staff will contact people on the current Interest List
  • Each resident 18+ years of age must complete and submit a Pre-Screening Application, and pay the application fee of $35 for each applicant 18+ years of age
  • Pre-screening will include criminal and credit checks
  • Staff will begin scheduling appointments with pre-screened applicants on November 20th
  • Applicants will be placed on waiting list once pre-screening applications are received by property management;
  • Applicants approved during the pre-screening process will be notified via phone; Once notified, an applicant has 72 hours to submit all additional required documents

 

If you wish to be placed on the current interest list or know someone who does, or if you have specific questions about the application process and schedule, please contact Centra Square Property Management at: 866.902.2298

The temporary leasing office will be open to visitors at 1400 Allen St, Charlotte, NC 28205.

 

 

Rezoning Petition: 1035 Harrill Street and 923 Belmont Avenue

Site plan prepared October 19, 2017.

Site plan prepared October 19, 2017.

 

923 Belmont Avenue, Rendering provided courtesy of D3 Studio

 

923 Belmont Avenue, Rendering provided courtesy of D3 Studio

Dates to Remember:

Public Hearing Date: TBD

 

Additional Information:

Developer: City of Charlotte – Real Estate

Acreage: 0.844 acres

Existing Zoning: B-1

Proposed Zoning: MUDD-O

Existing Use: Vacant Commercial Building (2) and Single Family Residential (1)

Proposed Uses: Commercial Building (Eating, Drinking, Entertainment Establishment – Type 1 and 2)

Maximum Building Height: A maximum building height of 120 feet maximum as allowed in the MUDD-O District

Parking: 1 space/400 sqft

Proposed site plan and elevations submitted to the city with the rezoning application: click here

 

Recent and Related News:

08/31/2017 “NYC’s Siggy’s Good Food nabs Queen City location” – Charlotte Business Journal: Click here

 

Lumberjaxe, the region’s first axe-throwing facility, is gearing up for an early November opening. Here’s your first look inside.

The region’s first axe-throwing facility, Lumberjaxe, will open in Belmont the first weekend in November.

The new space, located at 933 Louise Avenue, is in addition to husband and wife duo Scott and Ashleigh Gadd’s refitted 1966 Continental pickup truck that allowed for two lanes at multiple mobile throwing events around the city for most of this year.

Owner Scott Gadd

This is the former site of the Kellogg’s factory, now home to Advent Coworking, Codescape and Catawba Brewing. The facility is just to the right of Catawba, next to its new Barrel Room.

[Related: Axe-throwing bars are a thing, and there’s one coming to Charlotte this fall]

933-louise-catawba-brewing

via Google Maps

The facility is just over 3,000 square feet, but is large enough to include five lanes, a few tables for eating and drinking and a bar when construction is finished.

When finished, each lane will have netting and a fence.

Though the city will likely cap the amount of people allowed inside at any given time at 140, Scott estimates that he and Ashleigh will keep it even smaller, around 100 throwers.

Throwers, who must be 18 and over, will be assigned to one of five lanes, which will run $20 per person per hour, and all equipment will be provided – just bring a pair of close-toed shoes.

Both reservations and walk-ins are welcome, but Gadd expects most throwers to reserve their spot first, and has installed an extra lane that will be kept open at all times in order to allow walk-ins to get a feel for the sport and learn to throw while they wait for a lane to free up.

Discounted rates for larger parties will also be available.

Both serious and casual throwers can rest assured that all aspects of Lumberjaxe’s business, down to axe weight and scoring, is up to the standards of the National Axe Throwing Federation.

Per the Lumberjaxe website: “During both private parties and league play, customers will participate in matches consisting of three rounds of five axe throws per play. Each lane consists of two targets where two customers will compete in head-to-head competition. Each customer will throw one axe at a time starting on or behind the throwing line that is 14’ from the target.”

While the bar won’t serve liquor, wine will be available and there will be a handful of local beers on tap.

Food won’t be available, either, but Gadd says that outside food will be welcome inside and that they’ll likely direct throwers to Catawba’s food trucks.

And, yes, the insurance situation is precisely what you think it is: Beyond expensive.

When asked about the insurance rates that come with mixing alcohol and axes, Gadd laughed and assured me rates – when they finally found someone to bully insure the business – are astronomical.

“In just the last year, they’ve raised the quote 60%,” he said, equating this to the fact that insurers likely didn’t know which number to start at, as places like this aren’t common throughout the U.S.

Tables were made from a tree that was struck by lightning in Gadd’s parents’ yard

Take a look around:

Lumberjaxe will open at 933 Louise Avenue the first weekend in November. Until then, you can connect on Facebook and Instagram.

Rezoning Petition: 1001 Belmont Avenue

1001 Belmont Avenue during the Belmont Avenue Better Block event on September 23, 2017

 

Dates to Remember:

Belmont Community Meeting Presentation: October 3, 2017 at 7:15 PM at the Salvation Army, 901 Belmont Ave, Charlotte NC

 

Additional Information:

Developer: 813 Belmont, LLC

Land Use and Zoning Consultant: ColeJenest & Stone

Acreage: 0.16 acres

Existing Zoning: R-5

Proposed Zoning: MUDD-O

Existing Use: Commercial Building and Single Family Residential

Proposed Uses: Commercial Building (Eating, Drinking, Entertainment Establishment – Type 1) and Single Family Residential

Maximum Building Height: A maximum building height of 120 feet maximum as allowed in the MUDD-O District

Parking: Residential – 1 space/dwelling unit, Commercial – 1 space/600 sqft

Proposed site plan and elevations submitted to the city with the rezoning application: click here

 

Recent News:

08/31/2017 “NYC’s Siggy’s Good Food nabs Queen City location” – Charlotte Business Journal: Click here

 

Centra Square Update (09/18/17)

Photo from Laurel Street development website.

 

The interest list for affordable housing is being created.

Construction on “Centra Square,” formerly known as “Allen Street Residences,” is well on the way! The project is expected to open the early part of 2018.

Thanks to the hard work of our neighbors, this final product will include additional improvements such as speed humps and other features.

Currently, there is an “interest list” available which will allow interested folks to be contacted when applications are available. If you want to be on this interest list, or know someone who does, please forward your name, phone number, and email (if available) to:

Kemena Brooks, Senior Development Manager
Laurel Street Residential
511 East Blvd, Charlotte, NC 28203
Phone: 704.561.5231
Email: Centra_InterestList@laurelstreetres.com

Or email Curtis Bridges, the Belmont Community Vice President at: curtis@belmontcharlotte.org

You can visit the developer’s website for this project here: http://laurelstreetres.com/development/centra-square/

Stay tuned for more updates!

 

 

Photo from Laurel Street development website.

Photo from Laurel Street development website.

What’s that weird blue structure down the street from Birdsong Brewing Co.?

Originally Posted By Katie Toussaint September 1, 2017 on CharlotteFive

There it is, just down the street from Birdsong Brewing Co. on Belmont Avenue: A weird blue structure. It’s a column painted bright blue, with chalkboard and cork board surfaces on some sides for community bulletins and personal notes. A Charlotte crown symbol is mounted on top.

The Morris Column, as it’s called, was erected during a volunteer workshop Tuesday for the Belmont Avenue Better Block project. It was hosted by the Belmont Community Association with assistance from the Better Block Foundation and the City of Charlotte Neighborhood Matching Grant program, according to a representative with the Charlotte Mecklenburg Planning Department.

The column (located at 923 Belmont Ave.) came from a wikiblock, or a toolkit of designs for structures like benches, chairs, stages and kiosks that can be downloaded for free, then cut from plywood at a makerspace by a CNC router, or a computer-aided machine. This particular one was was customized and cut by the neighborhood business 8Lincoln30, and constructed and painted by community members and volunteers in Charlotte’s Belmont neighborhood.

The workshop was a prelude to this month’s two-day, pop-up style Better Block project Sept. 23-24 at the intersection of Belmont Avenue and Harrill Street. The Belmont neighborhood received a $21,750 grant for the project, which is organized by the Dallas-based Better Block Foundation and will be the foundation’s first Better Block program in the Carolinas. The neighborhood aims to match the grant with more than 470 hours of volunteer work.

The whole purpose of Better Block projects is to get people involved in improving their neighborhoods. The way Jason Roberts, head of the Better Block Foundation, sees it, residents wanting to revitalize their neighborhood have the power to get creative and fix their streets themselves, rather than waiting for a big business like a Whole Foods or Chipotle to kickstart that change.

In addition to crafting the blue Morris Column, volunteers also painted and hung two sets of neighborhood identity signage along the Belmont Avenue corridor.

During the main event, the Belmont community will turn part of Belmont Avenue into a neighborhood main street envisioned and created by the community. Think temporary shops, cafés and businesses. Also in the plan is a mural to be painted by DeVaughn Johnson and a team of artists.

Leading up to the installment of the Morris Column as a workshop “test,” the community was surveyed about “interventions” they would like to see on Belmont Avenue. Responses included a local grocery, a community center and public space, and a local restaurant.

Meanwhile, the Morris Column can offer an offline way of communication for people in the Belmont community.

By Thursday, a chalkboard note brought up the question: What do you love about Belmont? Another chalkboard note shared information about the Belmont Community Association’s meetings the first Tuesday of every month, open to everyone. Flyers for church services and social work services were pinned to the cork board.

All that’s left is the main street transformation. Stop by The Belmont Avenue Better Block Sept. 23-24.

Learn more here.

Photos: Belmont Community Association

 

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